Editorial Policies

Focus and Scope

The Journal of Transport and Land Usepublishes original interdisciplinary papers on the interaction of transport and land use. Domains include: engineering, planning, modeling, behavior, economics, geography, regional science, sociology, architecture and design, network science, and complex systems.

Papers reporting innovative methodologies, original data, and new empirical findings are especially encouraged.

The Journal accepts a variety of paper types, including:

Articles and Manuscripts: report original data analysis and advance theory or methods (including applying methods in novel ways or to new questions), respond to one or two questions and typically are more than 2000 words (4000-10000 words is common, but there is no specific word count).

Literature Reviews: comprehensively and authoritatively describe any subject within the journal's scope. They have an educational aim and are typically on the order of 5,000 words, but there is no specific word count.

Correspondence: briefly document original data analysis (generally using established methods and testing previously proposed theories), generally under 2000 words.

Methods: present a new experimental or statistical method, test or procedure (e.g., GIS protocols or web interfaces), generally using established datasets. The method described may either be completely new, or may improve existing techniques. These are generally under 2000 words.

Viewpoints (Commentaries and Debates)
Present an argument that is not necessarily based on practical research. Debate articles can report on all aspects of the subject including theoretical, sociological and ethical aspects. Viewpoint and commentary focus and opine on specific issues within the journal's scope and are about 1,000 words.

Discussions (provide opinions, reactions, judgments of importance, and links/connections to other ideas and subfields): comment on previously published papers, which may be accompanied by a response from the original author.

Book Reviews: summarize and comment on recently published books, generally 1000 to 1500 words.


The Journal is published by the University of Minnesota Center for Transportation Studies.

 

Section Policies

Articles

Articles and Manuscripts: report original data analysis and advance theory or methods (including applying methods in novel ways or to new questions), respond to one or two questions and typically are more than 2000 words (4000-10000 words is common, but there is no specific word count).

Checked Open Submissions Checked Indexed Checked Peer Reviewed

Correspondence

Correspondence (Letters) (short empirical article): briefly document original data analysis (generally using established methods and testing previously proposed theories), generally under 2000 words.

Checked Open Submissions Checked Indexed Checked Peer Reviewed

Methods

Methods (short article): present a new experimental or statistical method, test or procedure (e.g., GIS protocols or web interfaces), generally using established datasets. The method described may either be completely new, or may improve existing techniques. These are generally under 2000 words.

Checked Open Submissions Checked Indexed Checked Peer Reviewed

Viewpoints

Viewpoints (Commentaries and Debates)
Present an argument that is not necessarily based on practical research. Debate articles can report on all aspects of the subject including theoretical, sociological and ethical aspects. Viewpoint and commentary focus and opine on specific issues within the journal's scope and are about 1,000 words.

Checked Open Submissions Checked Indexed Checked Peer Reviewed

Discussions

Discussions (provide opinions, reactions, judgments of importance, and links/connections to other ideas and subfields): comment on previously published papers, which may be accompanied by a response from the original author.

Editors
  • David Levinson
Checked Open Submissions Checked Indexed Checked Peer Reviewed

Book Reviews

Book Reviews: summarize and comment on recently published books, generally 1000 to 1500 words.

Editors
  • Jan-Dirk Schmöcker
Checked Open Submissions Checked Indexed Checked Peer Reviewed

Special Section: Rail Transit Development in China and Beyond

Editors
  • Mi Diao
  • Yingling Fan
  • Xueliang Zhang
Checked Open Submissions Checked Indexed Checked Peer Reviewed

WSTLUR 17 Special Section: Technological Change

How do newly emerging disruptive technologies shape or change transportation and land use systems? How can we integrate technological and land use strategies to achieve long term planning goals? What is the role of land use in smart cities? Specific topics include the connection between land use and transportation systems with Information and Communication Technology (ICT) and new ICT-enabled products and services such as automated vehicles, new energy technologies, big data applications, ridesharing systems, real-time traveler information, and smart cities in general.

Theme leaders: Meead Saberi, Monash University; João de Abreu e Silva, Técnico Lisboa

Editors
  • João de Abreu e Silva
  • Meead Saberi
Checked Open Submissions Checked Indexed Checked Peer Reviewed

WSTLUR 17 Special Section: Equity

Equity*

Public and private transport services are unevenly distributed, spatially and socioeconomically. Their environmental, economic, and accessibility impacts may sometimes ameliorate and at other times deepen existing inequalities. Integrated land use and transport planning has similarly uneven impacts, and may sometimes serve the interests of the affluent while neglecting those of lesser means. Access to transport opportunities created by ICT advances is a particularly recent concern. Who will benefit from current and prospective land use and transportation planning and policies, and how do these impacts vary within cities, metropolitan regions, countries, and regions of the world? Examples of potential topics include gentrification and displacement caused by land use and transport planning; implications of the emergence of Transportation Network Companies (TNCs) for accessibility for different groups; participatory processes in land use and transport planning; ethnic/racial discrimination in land and transport markets; and environmental justice issues related to modern forms of transport and land use planning.

Theme leaders: Dan Chatman, University of California, Berkeley; Corinne Mulley, University of Sydney; Ahmed El Geneidy, McGill University

Editors
  • Dan Chatman
  • Ahmed El-Geneidy
  • Corinne Mulley
Checked Open Submissions Checked Indexed Checked Peer Reviewed

WSTLUR 17 Special Section: Active Travel

Active travel

How do land use and urban design features stimulate active travel? How can we understand trends in active travel in different geographical settings and land use systems? What are the main health benefits of active travel, and what types of active travel are most effective in bringing about these benefits? What are health risks of active travel for specific (vulnerable) groups? How can methods and tools for measuring and modeling active travel be improved? What are the implications for land use and transport policies?

Theme leaders: Kelly Clifton, Portland State University; Robert Schneider, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Editors
  • Kelly Clifton
  • Robert Schneider
Checked Open Submissions Checked Indexed Checked Peer Reviewed

WSTLUR 17 Special Section: Changing Cities

Transportation/land use systems in growing and shrinking cities

The world is urbanizing at a rapid pace. Cities in parts of Asia, Latin America, and Africa are growing at unprecedented speeds to unprecedented sizes. At the same time, many cities in wealthy nations are experiencing substantial population decline, while many others are attracting extreme levels of immigration from poorer countries. How does this rapidly changing environment influence relationships between urban form and transportation? What relationships are stable across people, place, and time? How can transportation investments influence growth and decline? What are the implications for land use and transportation policies?

Theme leader: Erick Guerra, University of Pennsylvania, Joel Franklin, KTH Royal Institute of Technology

Editors
  • Joel Franklin
  • Erick Guerra
Checked Open Submissions Checked Indexed Checked Peer Reviewed

WSTLUR 17 Special Section: Social Psychology

Social psychology, land use and travel behavior

Travel choices are conditioned by decisions about residential and work locations, and decisions about where to live and work are influenced by their implications for daily travel and accessibility of facilities. To date, the vast majority of studies of this interaction have assumed that individuals and households act as omniscient utility maximizers, in accordance with economic theory. Mounting evidence suggests, however, that decisions about travel and land use are based on alternative psychological mechanisms, and that studying those mechanisms is vital for understanding travel behavior and land use patterns. Examples of potential topics include the role of attitudes and values in residential, work and daily travel decisions; the psychological background of residential self-selection; the trade-off between daily and longer term decisions; the role of norms and environmental awareness; social influence on land use and travel decisions; motivation and self-control in travel behavior change; behavior change and adherence in response to interventions or rewards; and the impact of land use and daily travel on well-being.

Theme leaders: Susan Handy, University of California, Davis; Dick Ettema, Utrecht University

Editors
  • Dick Ettema
  • Susan Handy
Checked Open Submissions Checked Indexed Checked Peer Reviewed

WSTLUR 17 Special Section: Emerging Issues in Asia

Emerging transportation/land use issues in Asia

Papers that examine and/or discuss emerging transportation and land use issues in Asia, in the contexts of large-scale urbanization, technology advancement, and unique demographic and cultural aspects. Topics may include: planning and policy implications of shared use mobilities in Asian cities; how the introduction of disruptive technologies in Asia is changing travel patterns, dynamics and behavior; transport and land use interaction in Asia's small and medium sized cities; governance of transport and land use in Asia's megacities and city-regions; and equitable and inclusive transport in Asian cities.

Theme leaders: Yingling Fan, University of Minnesota; Iderlina Mateo-Babiano, University of Queensland

Editors
  • Yingling Fan
  • Iderlina Mateo-Babiano
Checked Open Submissions Checked Indexed Checked Peer Reviewed

WSTLUR 2017

Other topics

All other papers on transportation and land use issues submitted to WSTLUR 2017 that do not fit into other categories .

Theme leaders: David Levinson, University of Minnesota; João de Abreu e Silva, Técnico Lisboa; Robert Schneider, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Editors
  • João de Abreu e Silva
  • David Levinson
  • Robert Schneider
Checked Open Submissions Checked Indexed Checked Peer Reviewed
 

Peer Review Process

All manuscripts published in this journal undergo rigorous peer reviews, based on initial screening by an editor. Manuscripts are double-blind at the discretion of the author. The reviews are anonymous and typically completed by at least three referees.
Articles should be original, scientifically correct, clearly written, and reproducible. The topic must be within the journal's scope.

All papers will be reviewed by the assigned editor and evaluated for the quality of research and writing, as well as for the appropriateness for publication in the Journal of Transport and Land Use. Papers that are not well written or within the Journal's scope will be returned to the authors directly with a "not accepted" decision.

Each paper passing the initial screening of the assigned editor will receive a minimum of 2 reviews that will assess the paper on the standards identified above. Reviews are expected to be completed in 4 weeks. Reviewers will be drawn from the Editorial Board, authors, and others who have knowledge of the subject matter.

All submissions (including technical papers, case study papers, discussion forum articles, literature reviews, and book reviews) will be "accepted" or "not accepted" on the first round.

"Accepted" papers may still have comments from reviewers and editors to strengthen the paper, which we strongly encourage the authors to consider and incorporate, but the paper is of "acceptable" quality as submitted.

"Not accepted" papers that are within the scope of JTLU may be significantly revised and resubmitted. The editors will determine if a resubmitted paper is substantially improved, and if so, re-send for review to previous or new reviewers. It will be considered a new submission.

 

Publication Frequency

The Journal of Transport and Land Use is published three times a year.

 

Open Access Policy

This journal provides immediate open access to its content on the principle that making research freely available to the public supports a greater global exchange of knowledge.

 

Archiving

This journal utilizes the LOCKSS system to create a distributed archiving system among participating libraries and permits those libraries to create permanent archives of the journal for purposes of preservation and restoration. More...

 

Rationale

The Journal is open access. Articles accepted and published in the Journal will be free to read for anyone with internet access. This increases the visibility of scientific communication, both to other researchers and to the public at large. The research will not be held captive by for-profit publishers or buried in stacks of university libraries. All papers accepted for publication will be licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial License 3.0 .


The Journal charges $500 per paper for editing and layout. These fees are waived for members of the World Society for Transport and Land Use Research (WSTLUR) and on an as-needed basis. The Journal is operated on a volunteer basis with institutional support from the Center for Transportation Studies at the University of Minnesota and additional financial support from the World Society for Transport and Land Use Research (WSTLUR).


The Journal is peer-reviewed. All scientific articles are reviewed by other researchers in the field for their scientific merit on questions of transport and land use (including originality, accuracy, relevance, importance, and transparency – including comprehensibility and reproducibility). Reviews, Opinion, and Commentary are reviewed by the editors.


The Journal is timely. Articles submitted may be posted at the "Under Review" section immediately (after a brief review of relevance by the editors). These papers will be indexed as working papers in Research Papers in Economics (RePEc) and TRID with appropriate metadata.


The Journal will help advance other research. The data used in papers and unique software described in papers will be made publicly available if not already archived (safeguarding privacy where necessary) to ensure transparency and reproducibility of the research.


We aim for a six week turnaround between submission and reviews being returned to the author. Once a paper has been accepted and is properly formatted, it will be posted immediately. The paper will be re-indexed as a peer-reviewed journal article.


The Journal aims for legitimacy and widespread dissemination. The Journal's ISSN number is: 1938-7849 . We are seeking indexing in the Thomson-ISI Index of Scientific Journals. The Journal itself is be indexed in the Directory of Open Access Journals, Google Scholar, and Scopus.


A flyer summarizing the journal's aims can be downloaded here.