Rideshare mode potential in non-metropolitan areas of the northeastern United States

Brian Ho-Yin Lee, Lisa Aultman-Hall, Matthew Coogan, Thomas Adler

Abstract


This study focuses on work commuters who currently rideshare, are potential rideshare commuters, or indicated a willingness to use rideshare services. Discrete choice models were developed with survey data of residents in the northeastern United States. Built-environment variables based on home and workplace locations were examined. While the socio-demographic characteristics of rideshare commuters and potential rideshare commuters were similar, characteristics of those indicating a willingness to use rideshare services were dissimilar, specifically women and younger individuals were uninterested in these programs. Those who live in denser areas were more likely to rideshare now, but less likely to indicate rideshare as their alternative to driving alone. Having a rural workplace corresponded to more ridesharing and being willing to use rideshare services, but less likely to indicate rideshare in place of driving alone. Many attitudinal variables were examined in the models; but interestingly most were not useful in explaining potential ridesharers or potential rideshare program participants. This analysis indicates that potential rideshare commuters may be demographically similar to existing rideshare commuters but live and work in more rural areas. Those who would participate in rideshare programs are a different set and should be further defined and targeted separately.

Keywords


Rideshare, Carpool, Behavior, Mode Choice

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References


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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5198/jtlu.2015.669


Copyright (c) 2015 Brian H.Y. Lee, Lisa Aultman-Hall, Matthew Coogan, & Thomas Adler